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Archive for August, 2012

Ethiopia is a unique destination in that it combines vast natural, historical, and cultural treasures all within one border.  It is the source of the Nile, land of the Queen of Sheba and the Axumite civilization, home of the Ark of the Covenant, the origin of mankind, one of the original centers of plant and animal domestication including coffee and teff, the medieval castles of Gondar, and home to the 8th wonder of the world, the rock hewn churches of Lalibela.  It also has an astonishing variety of landscapes, from rugged mountains to the rift valley lakes and their birds, to the Danakil Depression, which contain live lava lakes and geysers.  Unsurprisingly then, Ethiopia has the most number of World Heritage sites in Africa (9).  Yes, that means Ethiopia has more world heritage sites than Egypt and Tunisia.

Henok A.

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McKinsey Global Institute report

In its Aug. 2012 quarterly report the following fact based information which might contribute to decision making on critical policy issues are included.

  • The two leading emerging economies of China and India are experiencing roughly ten times the economic acceleration of the Industrial Revolution.
  • By 2025, for the first time in world history, the number of people in the consuming class will exceed the number still struggling to meet their most basic needs.
  • By 2025 MGI estimates annual consumption in emerging markets will rise to $30 trillion, up from $12 trillion in 2010.
  • Even under the most pessimistic scenarios for global growth, emerging markets are likely to outperform developed economies significantly for decades.
  • Consumers in the emerging markets are shaping, not just participating in the digital revolution and are leapfrogging developed-market norms.
  • Companies failing to pursue consumers in these new markets will squander crucial opportunities.
  • On average, emerging consumers are younger and more optimistic than their counterparts in the developed world.
  • In China, more than half the urban population is online. In India, consumers are avoiding traditional media and PC to embrace mobile devices.
  • Unskilled workers may be plentiful in emerging societies, but skilled managers are scarce and hard to retain.
  • No matter where successful businesses operate, they need the support of key stakeholders in government, civil society, and the local media.
  • As emerging markets contribute a greater proportion of the global savings pool, investors there could offer a crucial new source of funding.
  • The rise of the emerging world’s new consumer class is the greatest competition of our age for business. Emerging markets offer the best hope for future prosperity.

Professor Mekonen Haddis

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RE:  Key note speech by Mary Robinson at the tenth Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture.

During her speech, the former president of Ireland had raised certain concerns:

 

  • Can it be truly said that freedom from want has been adequately secured for all in the past 18 years?
  • Another aspect of truth is admitting mistakes.
  • Friends tell me the ANC’s moral authority has been eroded, tainted by allegations of corruption; a temporary betrayal of its history.
  • Levels of crime and violence in some areas.
  • How can the inequities in the system be resolved so that every South African child has equal access to quality education?
  • Social media introducing new ways of empowering ordinary people.
  • Twice as many women as men have HIV. etc.

Professor Mekonen Haddis

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Reverse brain drain: the Portuguese fleeing to Angola and Mozambique.

With alarming unemployment rate for young people in Europe, the result of the economic crisis since 2008, and the inability of European governments to be able and create economic growth, young and educated Europeans are fleeing their homes in search of greener pastures. While thousands of educated workers are fleeing Greece for Germany, thousands of Spaniards are abandoning their homes to look for work in Brazil and Venezuela.

As they say in the States, “what goes up must come down”. It seems as if governments never learn from history. Governments always hasten their demise because of arrogance, greed and dare I say obvious stupidity. Europe’s bankrupt economic policy based on austerity has created frustrated and hopeless class of well educated youngsters.

Europe’s economic crisis is reshaping migration trends of the well educated. Instead of qualified Africans abandoning their homes for Europe, the Portuguese are now fleeing in droves to the booming economies of Angola and Mozambique. This is a remarkable situation of reverse brain drain.

While Europe is the past Africa is the future.

Professor Mekonen Haddis

 

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